Fertility Health Screening

Female Hormones Health Screening

€200

Estradiol

Follicle-stimulating hormone

Luteinising hormone

Thyroid stimulating hormone

Free thyroxine (FT4)

Free triiodothyronine (FT3)

Progesterone

 

 

Female Hormone Health Screening

The main package we offer measures a comprehensive set of hormones for women and includes:

Hormones on day three of your menstrual cycle. This cycle is measured from the first day of your period (blood flow, not spotting before 5 pm). At day 3 you can get the blood work performed to check the levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2) and thyroid hormones TSH and free T4.

  • Estradiol (E2) is one of the three main forms of oestrogen in women, which also include estrone (E1), and estriol (E3). E2 is involved in ovulation, conception, and pregnancy. This hormone is produced by the ovary and levels should be low in the early part of the menstrual cycle. High E2 day 3 levels may indicate a cyst in the ovary or diminished ovarian reserve.
  • Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are produced in the pituitary gland and regulate hormone production in the ovaries. FSH is responsible for the egg maturation process. High day 3 FSH levels are associated with diminished ovarian reserve. LH levels are increased before ovulation. If the level of LH is more than double FSH, this may indicate a hormonal imbalance that is often observed in PCOS.
  • Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (fT4): Low levels of the thyroid hormones will have a negative effect on fertility and can prevent ovulation or result in irregular or absent periods and loss of libido. The thyroid produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3) which are involved in the body’s use rate of energy or body’s metabolism. Most of T3 and T4 are bound to proteins however their biologically active form is unbound or free. The measurement of the free form is preferred as is not dependent on a number of proteins in the blood. The production of T3 and T4 is regulated by the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) which is produced in the pituitary gland.

Progesterone on day 21 or 7 days before the expected period.

  • Progesterone levels are measured during an infertility assessment when a woman is having trouble getting pregnant. This level helps to verify normal ovulation.This hormone is measured about seven days before the expected period which is around day 21 of a 28-day menstrual cycle.

The Fertility health screening measures the blood levels of key female hormones such as Estradiol, FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone),  LH (Luteinizing Hormone), and thyroid hormones such as Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (fT4). These tests are a relatively easy way of identifying infertility problems in a woman and in some cases, this may be enough to pinpoint the root of the problem.

Progesterone is a hormone produced mainly in the ovaries that readies the uterus for the possible implantation of a fertilized egg. If a fertilized egg implants, progesterone increase and then helps the uterine lining (endometrium) to maintain the pregnancy. Progesterone levels are measured after a woman ovulates known as the luteal phase. This day is related to the subsequent menstrual period, not the preceding one, so progesterone is measured about seven days before the expected period which is around day 21 of a 28-day menstrual cycle.

If you are finding it difficult to conceive, curious about your fertility status or worried about whether you are at risk of polycystic ovarian syndrome, these tests will help you to find out.

Undiagnosed and untreated coeliac disease causes fertility problems in up to 41% of these women.If you have a family history of coeliac disease, and you are having trouble getting pregnant, you should consider taking a coeliac disease health screening additional to the hormones tests.

Test type: Blood

Fasting is not required for the blood test. Drink plenty of water before the blood drawing as being well hydrated makes the blood drawing procedure easier.

Please note that certain medications can interfere with the free T4 test, If you take thyroid hormone as a treatment for thyroid disease, it is recommended that your blood sample is drawn before you take your dose for that day.

Please note that Estradiol, FSH and LH tests are taken on Day 3 of your menstrual cycle. Day 3 is the third day of your period where day 1 is when blood flow, not spotting occurs before 5 pm.

For the progesterone levels measurement, the test must be taken test seven days before an expected period which is day 21 of a 28-day menstrual cycle.  However, if your cycle is longer or shorter than 28 days, the testing day should be adjusted accordingly.

A small amount of blood will be drawn by trained staff from a vein in your arm using a needle. The procedure is quick and easy. Rarely, some people may feel faint or dizzy while having the blood taken and you may need to lie down to help you to feel better. The procedure may cause some minor discomfort and a small bruise may develop in the area where the needle was inserted. Press over the site where the needle was inserted, keeping your arm straight to reduce the likelihood of bruise formation. If you develop redness or inflammation in the same area, seek your doctor for advice.

A laboratory test result is produced after a scientific analysis done on a sample to assess an individual health status.

An abnormal finding may (but not necessarily) indicate a problem that needs to be addressed. We recommend that any abnormal result should promptly be consulted with your GP. Your doctor will evaluate the test results in the context of an overall clinical picture that takes into consideration your age, gender, ethnicity, family history, signs, symptoms, etc.

If you want to learn more how the results of your laboratory test help your doctor in understanding your health status, and in providing you with the right treatment; check http://labtestsonline.org, a public resource on lab tests that is produced by AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to clinical laboratory science and its application to healthcare.You can also visit http://patient.info for information about health conditions. Please note that this information should not be a substitute for a consultation with your doctor.

Please contact us, we will be happy to clarify any questions pertaining to your test results.

Female/ Male Hormone test

Testosterone

Testosterone Level Health Screening

Testosterone is a sex hormone produced mainly by the testicles and, to a minor extent, by the adrenal cortex. Its production is regulated via pituitary-gonadal feedback. Low levels are associated with low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, infertility, obesity and overall energy levels and behaviour.
The total testosterone test measures testosterone that is bound to proteins in the blood (e.g., albumin and sex-hormone binding globulin [SHBG]) as well as testosterone that is free or unbound.
If you are low on energy, experiencing a low sex drive, suffering from erectile dysfunction or worried about your fertility health should seriously consider this test.
The best time for the blood sample to be taken is between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Test type: Blood

Fasting is not required for the blood test. Drink plenty of water before the blood drawing as being well hydrated makes the blood drawing procedure easier.

For the testosterone levels measurement, the best time to take for the blood sample to be taken is between 7 am and 10 am.

A small amount of blood will be drawn by trained staff from a vein in your arm using a needle. The procedure is quick and easy. Rarely, some people may feel faint or dizzy while having the blood taken and you may need to lie down to help you to feel better. The procedure may cause some minor discomfort and a small bruise may develop in the area where the needle was inserted. Press over the site where the needle was inserted, keeping your arm straight to reduce the likelihood of bruise formation. If you develop redness or inflammation in the same area, seek your doctor for advice.

A laboratory test result is produced after a scientific analysis done on a sample to assess an individual health status.

An abnormal finding may (but not necessarily) indicate a problem that needs to be addressed. We recommend that any abnormal result should promptly be consulted with your GP. Your doctor will evaluate the test results in the context of an overall clinical picture that takes into consideration your age, gender, ethnicity, family history, signs, symptoms, etc.

If you want to learn more how the results of your laboratory test help your doctor in understanding your health status, and in providing you with the right treatment; check http://labtestsonline.org, a public resource on lab tests that is produced by AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to clinical laboratory science and its application to healthcare.You can also visit http://patient.info for information about health conditions. Please note that this information should not be a substitute for a consultation with your doctor.

Please contact us, we will be happy to clarify any questions pertaining to your test results.

Book here your appointment today

Approved by Irish Life Health

Check with your provider if our outpatient service is covered under your plan.

 

 

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Approved by Irish Life Health.
Check with your provider if our outpatient service is covered under your plan.